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Scott Kilgore Photography Nature, Wildlife, Auto Racing, Train, Railroad Photography, Fine Art Photography

Why Are There Watermarks Or Writing On All The Photographs On This Site?

Sadly, some people believe that photography is free. I have been in people's houses where someone was showing a print on their wall they made of an image that they dragged off a commercial website. This is the same thing as going into a store and taking something without permission. It is a form of theft.

In the 30 years I have sold my work, I have had numerous problems with theft. I had a client once who made duplicates of the transparencies that I shot for his company. He did not tell me he made dupes of my slides. It fact, he told me that he did not need them and dodged payment for the shoot.

A few months later I came into his firm and saw large prints of my pilfered work on the walls of the lobby and halls. His response - He didn't want to pay me for prints and didn't feel he had to.

Much more recently, for a short time I supplied good quality jpegs to portrait customers for review. This was a mistake. Almost every client simply took the review jpegs. When I didn't receive payment or a response that they didn't want them I checked the websites of clients who had websites. Sure enough, they used them.

Since I still like to provide images for review that at least look decent on the web, but are somewhat protected against theft, I watermark the site pictures.

Watermarking certainly won't keep anyone from copying the work. One with some skill in Photoshop can remove the watermarks. But this will also brand them as a thief.

Our Prints and bookmarks are very high resolution and very high quality. The files on this site cannot do them justice.

-2015 Note -

IF anything, these problems have gotten worse, except presenting high-resolution work on a computer screen. This has gotten better, computers are faster, data streams faster, but since theft is even more a problem, I will still not be presenting work at its full resolution. Some new (2014 or later images) files are 15,000 to 20,000 pixels in the widest dimension.

There is another reason not to change the presentation. I find it really annoying going to a website where it takes 30 seconds or more for their pages to load. It is ridiculous for it to take a quad-core i5 based computer just to load a website plastered with slow loading code and poorly coded outside ads, and popups.

Any page on this site should come up virtually instantaneously on a modern computer, even if you have 20 windows open in your browser.

Also, if you chose to receive Emails, I won't sell your info, and I don't keep an address book associated with my Email accounts. Plus, I won't even bug you much, many once or twice a year.

Taking Pictures Off The Web To Print Or Republish Without Payment. Why Is It Wrong?

This is copyright infringement. To put it very bluntly, it is stealing. Musicians, photographers, writers, designers, and other artists work very hard on their creations. Any art that can be easily copied at (or near) full quality is subject to theft.

Unfortunately, many individuals believe that they really don't have to pay for music or other art. Remember Napster in its original form. This took the practice of trading albums with your friends to record on tape and accelerated it to warp speed. And the general feeling from people who were involved in this rather blatant theft was that it was only hurting the record companies. The rationalization was that the record companies were ripping us off, so it was OK. Well, it wasn't OK. And it was the artists that were really getting hurt.

The same thing happens when an individual takes an idea from a designer or a photographic file from a photographer and prints or publishes or distributes it without permission and, or, payment.

As Jeff Goldblum's character in Jurassic Park relates,

Just because you can do something, doesn't mean you should.

This Site and All Contents Copyright Scott A. Kilgore This is not a source of free images

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